How “There’s An App For That” Has Changed Tech-Savvy Parenting

Tech and Parenting

In 2014, the average age of new mothers was 26, which puts many of today’s mothers born in 1990. Chances are, many of these women remember growing up with a home computer, AOL, and screen names on AIM…

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...and MySpace, Facebook, Razor phones, smartphones, kindles, tablets, and hundreds of apps they use every day.

Point being, today’s 20 and 30-somethings aren’t only comfortable with technology as solutions to their problems, but they’re actively adapting to and looking for new solutions, whether it be a new gadget or app.

It makes sense that this group would also look to technology as they become parents: How can I be a better parent, a more efficient parent, or even make parenting a little less scary?

Too Much Screen Time?

Of course, the “There’s An App For That” culture produced some incredible results for this generation of parenting: Is my baby pooping enough?, Is my baby breathing when sleeping?, How do I handle a first aid situation with young kids? How do I know the location of my family members? (FYI: Life360 has more than 50M downloads, although it can only be used with smartphone owners, which excludes anyone under 10 or so.) There’s even an app monitoring your kids’ screen time. There are countless blogs and Twitter accounts dedicated to recommending and reviewing ways to safely and effectively add technology into a new parent’s home.

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So, there really is “an app for that,” but is it always helpful?

Screen Time vs People Time

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With all these tech solutions, parents want to monitor more, kids push back, parents feel guilty for helicopter parenting, everyone bonds over an app, kids learn more, parents stay more organized, parents feel guilty for too much screen time, and on and on.

Parents are digitally more connected with their kids at every age, for better and for worse.

No solution is going to be perfect. No family is the same. But experts agree: It’s about finding the right balance. New parents should included the benefits of technology (education opportunities, managing family schedules, health, location) and try and reduce the negatives (helicoptering, too much screen time, not encouraging your kids to play with friends or play outside).

What about your tech home?

What do you think about technology solutions in your family? How do you balance screen time and real life? How do you set and provide a positive example of technology in your home? Let us know below!